B A B E S C H Annual Papers on Mediterranean Archaeology
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Abstract

Eric M. Moormann and Miguel John Versluys
The Nemrud Dag Project
First interim report

The Nemrud Dag is one of Turkey's most important archaeological sites. It has not been studied profoundly yet, because of its specific character, blending, as the original excavator Theresa Goell states, Graeco-Roman and Persian influences. In 2001 the University of Amsterdam started a project recording all the materials of the Nemrud Dag with an interdisciplinary team in order to create a exhaustive Site Information System (SIS) (comparable to a microtopographical Geographic Information System (GIS)). The first research showed the necessity of renewed studies as the excavation report were delayed and vital information was missing. This first interim reports provide the first detailed information on the site. Obviously, only at the final publication final conclusions will be formulated.

Article in volume 77, 2002, pages 73-111

The other articles in volume 77, 2002:

Klaas Vansteenhuyse
Political strategies and the settlement pattern in early Iron Age Philistiaview the abstract

R. de Zwarte
Evidence of the so-called Golden Section in Archaic South Italy: the Hera Temple I ('Basilica') at Paestum view the abstract
With an addendum on the Parthenon at Athens

Gina Salapata
Greek votive plaques: manufacture, display, disposalview the abstract

Hélène Verreyke
The Faliscan Red-Figured Stamnos of the University of Ghentview the abstract

Frank Vermeulen, Patrick Monsieur and Catharina Boullart
The Potenza Surveyview the abstract
Preliminary Report on Field Campaign 2001

Helke Kammerer-Grothaus
Die zerstörte Nekropole 'Via Imperiale' und die Mosaiken der Kirche S. Balbina in Rom view the abstract

Stephan T.A.M. Mols
Ricerche sulla pittura di Ostiaview the abstract
Status quaestionis e prospettive

D.C. Steures
Late Roman Thirstview the abstract
How Dark Coloured Drinking Sets from Trier were used

D.C. Steures
Germanic Pendants and a Roman Medallionview the abstract
Fifth-century Pendants from Late Roman Cemetery in the Inner City of Nijmegen